Best answer: What is the function of the district attorney?

Who does the DA work for?

In the United States, a district attorney (DA), state’s attorney, prosecuting attorney, commonwealth’s attorney, or state attorney is the chief prosecutor and/or chief law enforcement officer representing a U.S. state in a local government area, typically a county.

Who does the district attorney answer?

In practice, district attorneys, who prosecute the bulk of criminal cases in the United States, answer to no one. The state attorney general is the highest law enforcement officer in state government and often has the power to review complaints about unethical and illegal conduct on the part of district attorneys.

Why would a district attorney come to someone’s house?

There are also situations where District Attorneys can take people’s property, including money, even if the person hasn’t been convicted of a crime. Civil asset forfeiture is a way for prosecutors to seize property and money that law enforcement officers believe is connected to criminal activity.

Why are district attorneys so powerful?

The DA has immense power in influencing an individual’s decision to enter into a plea deal or to take their case to trial. More than 90 percent of all criminal cases end in a plea deal. The district attorney has the power to offer a sentence to the individual charged with a crime.

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Who does the DA represent?

A district attorney is a public official who is appointed or elected to represent the state in criminal judicial proceedings in a particular judicial district or county; an appointed or elected officer who prosecutes cases in a particular judicial district.

Who can fire a district attorney?

In some jurisdictions, the district attorney may be removed by the court in proceedings commenced by the interested parties or by IMPEACHMENT. The legislature, within constitutional limitations, may designate the nature of the removal proceeding.

Do district attorneys go to crime scenes?

There were a variety of approaches to whether and when a prosecutor should go to a crime scene. Some prosecutors go to every homicide scene, even before there is an arrest; other prosecutors only go to the scene if there has been an arrest. Still other prosecutors never go to a crime scene.

Who has more power a district attorney or a judge?

Prosecutors have more power in this system than any judge, any supreme court, any police officer, or any attorney,” he says. They decide what charges to file — “or more importantly, what charges not to file.”

What is the difference between prosecutor and attorney?

As nouns the difference between attorney and prosecutor

is that attorney is (us) a lawyer; one who advises or represents others in legal matters as a profession while prosecutor is a lawyer who decides whether to charge a person with a crime and tries to prove in court that the person is guilty.

Can a defendant talk to the district attorney?

A defendant in a criminal case can attempt to speak directly with the district attorney in an attempt to negotiate a resolution of the charges. … If a person is not represented by a lawyer (and even if the person is), then he/she should decide not to speak with the D.A.

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